The Link Between Lifestyle and Kidney Disease

One in three American adults is at risk for kidney disease, according to the National Kidney Foundation. Some of the risk factors are out of your control, but there are several that you can do something about: Not Controllable: family history of kidney failure; being age 60 or older; being African American/Black, Hispanic, Asian, Pacific…

Are Your Snacks Helping You or Hurting You?

There is a huge difference between a “snack” and a “treat”, regardless of what the food manufacturers try to tell you. A snack should be like a “mini meal” and contain smaller amounts of the nourishing foods that should make up your main meals. If your snack doesn’t both provide nutrition and keep you full…

This Dietitian Loves Her Coffee: Here’s Why

  I’ve gotten a lot of comments from surprised people when they see that I’m drinking coffee, because they falsely believe that it’s a “bad” habit.  It’s true that caffeine is an addictive stimulant and it’s also true that it has been linked to some pretty negative health problems, including: recurrent migraines, anxiety, insomnia, GERD,…

Moving Beyond Supplements to Medical Food

  Medical foods are becoming increasingly popular as patients and doctors alike search for alternatives to traditional medications. Medical Foods are in their own FDA regulated category and are defined as “a product specifically formulated for the dietary management of a nutritional need in order to manage a disease or health condition”. Unlike dietary supplements,…

Healthy-ish Hot Dogs, Brownies, and Baked Beans for the 4th

  What Most People Eat: Processed meats cooked at really high temperatures How to Make It Better: There are a lot of really good reasons to avoid processed meats, in general, and to especially avoid those that have been charred. If you want to learn more about the carcinogens and atherosclerosis-promoting compounds created naturally and…

It’s Not All About About Grams and Milligrams

During one of my most frustrating experiences in the fun field of clinical dietetics, I had a husband and wife who were obviously under the influence of at least one potent substance, yell the names of random foods at me in a rapid-fire style for well over an hour. He had hypertension and she had…

Worry More About Magnesium and Potassium

People tend to be most concerned with nutrients that the majority of younger people aren’t at risk for being deficient in, like B12 or protein. If you eat animal protein or a very well-planned vegetarian diet and are under the age of 60, you’re likely ok on these two. What you’re probably not OK on…

Why Everyone Should Be Eating Fruit. Everyone.

When you are a registered dietitian, a lot of things drive you nuts. The FDA, food marketers, bogus “experts”…it makes my skin crawl when people refuse to eat food or food ingredients and they can’t explain why, or they try to expound on their choices and it is a jumble of illogical, fake facts. People…

True or False: You Understand Sodium

True or False: Tabasco sauce is high in sodium. Roughly 60% of people with high blood pressure are genetically salt sensitive. Instant hot cereals are low in sodium. Eating more than 1 ¼ tsp of salt daily may increase your risk of stomach cancer by 51%. Cream cheese is low in sodium. Parmesan cheese is…

Why is Everyone Always Talking About Fiber?

Fruits, vegetables, and whole grains are great sources of fiber. But why does that matter? Fiber helps you to achieve and maintain a healthy body weight.  Fiber takes more chewing, slow the passage of food through the digestive tract so that you feel full, and may stimulate hormones that tell the brain to stop eating….

How Much Water Did You EAT Today?

We tend to eat the same volume of food every day. If you try to lose weight by reducing the volume of food that you eat, you are setting yourself up for failure.You need to eat the same amount of food that you’re used to, but choose lower calorie foods. The calorie density of an…

Colorectal Cancer: The Link to Red Meat and Processed Meat

If you’ve been anywhere near a TV or computer today, you’ve probably heard that scientists are reporting a sharp rise in colorectal cancers in adults as young as their 20s and 30s. Possible explanations for this dangerous trend are obesity, sedentary lifestyles, alcohol, chronic conditions like inflammatory bowel disease and Type 2 diabetes, and HPV…